The default speed limit on all of Kentucky’s state maintained highways is 55 mph. You can find this in KRS 189.390 (3)

(3) The speed limit for motor vehicles on state highways shall be as follows, unless conditions exist that require lower speed for compliance with subsection (2) of this section, or the secretary of the Transportation Cabinet establishes a different speed limit in accordance with subsection (4) of this section:
(a) Sixty-five (65) miles per hour on interstate highways and parkways;
(b) Fifty-five (55) miles per hour on all other state highways; and
(c) Thirty-five (35) miles per hour in a business or residential district.

While this is the state’s (lazy) way of handling complicated people, I’d like to re-visit an old idea.

Driving at speeds appropriate for road conditions.

As explained in Motorist Awareness Wednesday.

Driving at or near the speed limit is not a right. You will not find anywhere in the Constitution of the United States nor in the Bill of Rights, any mention that speed or unfettered speed is your right.

Passing a slower moving vehicle is also not a right. As explained in Extremist Thinking is Hurting Cycling.

Priority NOT Right of Way.

Like Crash or Collision Vs. Accident, words have meaning. Educating motorists about right of way needs to include the understanding of Priority.

Note that the law does not allow anyone the right-of-way. It only states who must yield. When a driver is legally required to yield the right-of-way but fails to do so, other drivers are required to stop or yield as necessary for safety. So, if another driver does not yield to you when he or she should, forget it. Let the other driver go first. You will help prevent accidents and make driving more pleasant. Via: DriversEd.com

You may have heard “You might be right but you might also be ‘dead’ right.” This is where we get that phrase which has been bastardized into an argument for PRO edge riding Vs. LANE CONTROL. The creeping idea, much like a bad ‘B’ horror film, is that from out of nowhere a motorist is going to run you over from behind. This has happened to people, which only reinforces their pre-conceived notion. But it has happened to people who ARE EDGE RIDING! *

Lane control works to help good drivers from making bad choices. There is no infrastructure on this earth which will prevent bad drivers from making bad choices. Nor will that infrastructure protect cyclists from bad drivers who make bad choices, as explained in Homicidal Maniac.

Which is why we need to take driving seriously.

It isn’t enough to educate law enforcement or have them “Get tough on motor vehicle crime,” those are old ’80s ideas and we don’t need another “War.”

We need education.

I personally believe that 90% of motorists are 100% uneducated on the value of operating at lower speeds and obeying traffic signals. I also believe that our lax enforcement of existing laws and current infrastructure are due to poor education and biased education.

There is so much room for improvement on education alone.

Education is a thankless, unsexy, and daunting task. But it can be done.

For anyone who says “we’ve had education for the past 50-100 years and it hasn’t done anything,” is presenting a straw man argument. Did you take a class at school to learn how to operate a bicycle and obey traffic laws on your bicycle? I didn’t think so. Did you have any questions on your driver’s test about how to operate around bicycles? I didn’t think so.

That’s just the surface of education. There is so much more education to be had, but we won’t have it as long as the “bicycle specific infra. only cult” has their way. These are the people who shout you down when you mention education. They are also the people who sit on your panel at John J. College of Criminal Justice during the Left Forum and smirk when you mention education. (Cough cough TransAlt.)

Education is important. So important that other countries have made higher education a “right for all” by making it free.

Infrastructure is important but you can ride your bicycle in the worst infrastructure possible and still do so safely, when you’re educated. Like I did.

DRIVERS ARE RESPONSIBLE

When I read or listen to people’s arguments about how bad drivers are so bad and so frequent that we have to have special infra because there are just TOO MANY distractions for modern day drivers. I see a person who doesn’t want to take responsibility for their own actions. They are making excuses and wanting to blame everything and everyone else for their own poor choices.

Nobody is forcing you to drive distracted.

Nobody is forcing you to drive at speeds unsafe for road conditions.

You alone are to blame.

It used to be that an auto crash was so impactful that people “felt” that “the horror” of the crash was punishment enough. The knowledge that you took someone’s life was knowledge that you’d have to live with for the rest of your life.

How soul crushing.

Now, thanks in part to religion, we can pray all that away. Our prayers will forever lift up those killed and ease the burden of anyone who did the killing. A little religious dusting up and a healthy dose of conservative “it’s my God given right,” values and they are off and zooming towards their next collision. With the help of the auto insurance lobby, all auto wrecks are paid for by insurance. And if you’re well to do, especially if, you’ll hear people talking about the “Better Car” they’re going to buy instead of how torn up they are that they took a life. That doesn’t mean that I think we shouldn’t have insurance. I think that we have used insurance as an excuse to do bad things in our autos. TOWANDA!!

Who would not want to drive without fear of having an accident and not lose a lot of money ? With it, you can cover all traffic complications. This type of car insurance is especially necessary if you drive the car for someone else or a company car. Even driving a car on a loan would be much safer if you fully insured cheap full coverage auto insurance. Via: ReadingRobot

But ingrained in our psyche is that old idealism about “surviving an auto crash is punishment enough.” I’m sure you’ve heard “Let the punishment fit the crime,” in auto traffic injuries and fatalities it’s rare to see the punishment fit the crime. We have a winking idealism to “minor traffic” infractions.

Whether a defendant – the person convicted of a crime – broke a state or federal law, when it comes determining his punishment or sentence, an overriding concern is that it be proportional to his crime. In other words, the punishment should “fit the crime.” The idea is easy to understand. We don’t want to send people to prison for minor traffic offenses. Putting that idea into action, however, isn’t always so simple. Via: LawyersDotCom

In Conclusion:

I believe we need to revisit driver responsibility and figure out effective ways of getting the message across to people.

YOU ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR HOW YOU DRIVE.

Thank goodness traffic wasn’t too badly impacted. (Sarcasm)

I’m (not) sorry, reporting with emphasis about traffic being congested due to a crime scene isn’t good reporting.

http://www.wkyt.com/content/news/Deadly-crash-involving-bicyclist-in-Bourbon-County-376000511.html

My heartfelt condolences to all my cycling friends in Lexington Kentucky and to the family of Dr. David Cassidy.

 

*One of the things I did, when I was furiously preparing for my trial, was to gather all current online news articles about auto on bike crashes. I was able to find enough articles, showing that cyclists were struck from behind while edge riding, to fill a manilla folder. Much to my local lawyers disgust. He was disgusted at how frequently I was emailing him these articles. He never once bothered to call me and talk to me about the articles or ask me why I was collecting them. I was annoying to him and to his friends. One of whom works for a local media station. I was that “crazy lady” to them. I didn’t matter to their upper crust world and I certainly didn’t fit their ideal as to what a “real” cyclist encompasses.

I talk more about this in my book.

 

 

 

 

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